Taiwan-based industrial networking, computing and automation solutions provider Moxa has released an update for some of its wireless access points (APs) to address a critical vulnerability that can be exploited by hackers to gain complete control of affected devices.

Researchers at Cisco’s Talos intelligence and research group have analyzed Moxa’s AWK-3131A AP/bridge/client product, which is recommended for any type of industrial wireless application, and discovered hardcoded credentials corresponding to an account that cannot be disabled or removed.

Moxa AP

According to researchers, an attacker can leverage the username “94jo3dkru4” and the password “moxaiwroot” to log in to an undocumented account that provides root privileges.

The flaw, tracked as CVE-2016-8717, has been patched by Moxa with a software update. Users who cannot immediately apply the patch have been advised by Cisco to disable remote access services such as SSH and Telnet.

Experts at Cisco have identified a significant number of vulnerabilities as part of their research into Moxa’s AWK-3131A product. The list includes authentication issues that allow dictionary attacks and session hijacking, many cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities in the web interface, information disclosure bugs, denial-of-service (DoS) flaws, and several command injections.

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Technical details on the other security holes were made public earlier this month after Moxa had released fixes. CVE-2016-8717 was mentioned in Cisco’s initial advisory, but its details were not disclosed to prevent potential attacks.

Cisco said Moxa has been very cooperative and it even gave researchers access to some of its source code.

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Related: Flaws Found in Moxa Factory Automation Products

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Eduard Kovacs is an international correspondent for SecurityWeek. He worked as a high school IT teacher for two years before starting a career in journalism as Softpedia’s security news reporter. Eduard holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial informatics and a master’s degree in computer techniques applied in electrical engineering.

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